DCAPS
Digital Consulting & Production Services

Grants Program for Digital Collections in the College of Architecture, Art and Planning

The College of Architecture, Art and Planning (AAP) Grants Program funds one project each year in support of digital scholarship that holds value to the Cornell community and beyond. Proposals will be assessed using the following criteria.

Collections should:

  • Service scholarly and teaching activities
  • Support the innovative use of resources through the creation of digital collections
  • Foster scholarship in art, architecture and/or planning
  • Provide digital content of enduring value

Interdisciplinary projects are encouraged.

Digital Consulting and Production Services (DCAPS) will assist the applicants in preparing preliminary work plans. The Library’s proposal preparation team (Dianne Dietrich, Tre Berney and Marsha Taichman) will facilitate this meeting to answer questions about timelines and budgets for the funded project before they are implemented. The focus of the review process will not be on the soundness of the technical plan but rather on the overall scholarly contributions of the proposed digital collections.

For more information, please contact Marsha Taichman, Visual Resources & Public Services Librarian at met228@cornell.edu.

View past Digital Collections in AAP awards  

How to Apply

The 2018 grant cycle is now closed. Please check back in the fall for details about the 2019 grant.

If you are interested in applying, please email Marsha Taichman (met228@cornell.edu) and answer the following questions by March 30, 2018:

  • Who is the principal applicant and are there collaborators?
  • Who owns the collection?
  • Who are the current users of this collection?
  • What is the estimated collection size (number of pages, slides, prints, etc.)?
  • What are the document types (photographs, drawings, etc.)?
  • Is this work your intellectual property?
  • Will you need to secure permission to digitize anything related to this project?
  • What is the collection’s impact on scholarship at large and in your discipline?